Words Can Just Shred Your Insides

“It’s amazing how words can do that, just shred your insides apart.” – Lauren Oliver

They really can. Some ~10 years ago I read If He Had Been With Me by Laura Nowlin. I read the book in a matter of hours and felt like I had been on a roller coaster of emotions. By the end I was in tears. And then I picked it up again and savored it a second time, taking in the highs and lows, the tearful parts, the sweet moments. I cried for days and thought about it for longer. I still do now, from time to time. I picked it up a couple of years ago again and realized it no longer brought out the same whirlwind of emotions in me, but Nowlin used her words to create something that has stuck with me through all the books I’ve read, and that’s special.

Has this ever happened to you? Tell me about a book that’s shredded your insides.

It’s a little bit strange sometimes

It’s strange because sometimes, I read a book, and I think am the people in the book – The Perks of Being a Wallflower

I don’t know that I’ve ever gotten so lost in a book that I thought I was a character from it. I have felt their emotions so deeply that I’ve cried for them, laughed with them, and been angry on their behalf. Sometimes I wish I was wherever they are. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to wander the halls of Hogwarts, or run through the valleys in one of the Anne of Green Gables books, or hide from the ghosts and monsters in a haunted mansion?

I’ve talked about this with other people before. They don’t really get it. I like to reread a book and relive the experiences and places and emotions of a character. Books are friends. Consume them, but it’s okay to cherish them too.

Tell me about a book you’ve felt this way about.

Bad Magic and the Big Top (Blackwood Bay Witches #2) by Misty Bane

The circus has come to town. But first, Dru Rathmore Davis has to do something about the dead clown on her doorstep. She wakes up one morning to discover her bookshop has been broken into, but something more sinister awaits.

Life in the sleepy seaside town Dru moved to recently has been anything but sleepy. It’s been a month since she found out she’s a witch, can see ghosts, and talk to animals. And now she, along with her Guardian, Harper, have to contend with an influx of acrobats, fire breathers, and – to Dru’s disdain – clowns. As a clown hater myself, I feel her pain.

While Harper and the rest of the police force are on the case, Dru pulls her former life’s private investigator skills out of her back pocket. As circus performers start dropping like flies days after their arrival in Blackwood Bay, it’s all hands on deck despite Harper’s pledge as a Guardian to keep Dru away from all things dangerous.

Bad Magic and the Big Top by Misty Bane is the second installment in her Blackwood Bay Witches series. It’s not as good as the first, but it’s a quick little cozy mystery if you’re into that sort of thing. I enjoyed Harper and Dru’s friends but wishing they were more thing, and their banter is realistic. Dru is the kind of woman who isn’t looking for a hero to save her, and I find it relatable and refreshing. This one needed more Granny and the rest of the Coven. Granny’s sarcastic demeanor and the witches lovable personalities were definitely missed.

But I did enjoy the breaking and entering chicken escapades. As someone who lives in a town where chickens occasionally get loose and stop traffic, it’s frustrating and hysterical and I loved that it showed up in a book I was reading. Also, I’d really like my own cleaning fairies. That would be fire.

Goodreads rating: 2 of 5 stars.

Would I read it again? Probably not.

We can’t kill our way out of this one.

Have you ever done a double take at a quote or a book title? I had that moment a few days ago when I came across this promo image on Pinterest for A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas. Released in 2018, apparently I added it to my never-ending TBR list on Goodreads, and it’s a novella – a side story to Maas’ best selling Court of Thorns and Roses series (also added to my TBR). While I’m currently making my way through some autumn inspired reads, the title and tagline of this have me entirely too intrigued. Hopefully I’ll remember to come back to it in a few weeks, and not leave it lost on a virtual shelf for another three years.

Chain of Gold (The Last Hours #1) by Cassandra Clare

I looked up Cassandra Clare recently and had one of those moments where you realize just how old you are. I’ve been reading Clare’s works since 2007 and recently recalled a memory where, upon reading her outline for all her Shadowhunter books, I realized I’d be 30 by the time she finished. It’s been fourteen years; she’s still writing and I’m still reading.

I had to google to see where I’d left off in the universe and was pleasantly surprised to see I was only two books behind. So I’m not terribly late to Chain of Gold by Cassandra Clare. I did have to research a little to familiarize myself with the timeline though.

I was pleasantly surprised to find this installment introduced Will & Tessa Herondale’s children, formally of Clare’s Infernal Devices series. I’d forgotten how much I liked the Victorian era Shadowhunters. I might have to reread that series again.

Cordelia Carstairs has come to London under the cover of becoming parabatai to Lucie Herondale. Together, they will be closer than sisters, warriors bound together in a ceremony many young Shadowhunters take part in with those closest to them. But really, she and her mother and brother have come so that she can seek someone to marry. With her father awaiting trial in Idris for a terrible crime, marriage is the only way her family can save their reputation.

She’s lonely, seeing strangers in every face except her girlhood friend Lucie, and Lucie’s older brother James. Soon, she becomes swept up in the lives of the next generation of Herondales, Fairchilds, Lightwoods, and Blackthorns. There’s fancy dress balls, picnics in the park, and explosions in secret laboratories. Sadly, only a whisper of Church, a cat with the lifespan of a warlock, who appears in most Shadowhunter novels.

Demon activity has been quiet for many years. Even though nephilim continue to train, the young know nothing except stories of what it is to be a true hero. But when demons begin to strike in daylight – unheard of behavior, and Shadowhunters become ill from wounds healing ruins can’t fix, Cordelia, Lucie, and the Merry Thieves (James’ group of social miscreants) become entangled in a story with deep and dark ties to their own. With London under quarantine against the attacks, Cordelia learns the true meaning of family and being a hero.